Imminent Threat to Climbing in California State Parks

Via the Access Fund:

“Your help is needed to stop the indefinite closure of 70 California State Parks. As budget battles continue in Sacramento, parks around the state face an uncertain future. In response to recent cuts, the California Department of Parks and Recreation has released a list of state parks that will be closed. Included in the closures are the granite spires of Castle Crags State Park and the iconic sandstone boulders of Castle Rock State Park. The park closures will cut off access to these popular climbing areas, eliminate a funding source for the state, and severely impact local economies.”

“California State Parks have been threatened with cuts and closures for years. This is ironic given that studies consistently demonstrate the economic benefit of the parks for both the state and park adjacent areas. A 2009 study found that State Park visitors spend $6.9 billion annually traveling to and recreating in State Parks. These dollars multiply through the economy and the California Department of Parks and Recreation has found that they sustain well over 100,000 jobs. The amount saved by closing these parks will cut off access to popular crags, do little to solve California’s budget problems, and comes at a time when the state received a $6.6 billion revenue windfall. See this map for a state park near you that is on the chopping block.”

Write your state representative—and copy Ruth Coleman, Director of California State Parks—today and tell them to restore funding for California State Parks!

Click here to view the original post and access an email template to shape a letter to your representatives and help save climbing in California State Parks. Personal communication is always the most effective way to influence policymakers, so please add reflections about your experiences in some of the parks listed for closure.


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