Category Archives: Hardware

Video: Wild Country Crack School- Episode 5

In the final episode of Wild Country’s Crack School video series, Tom Randall and Pete Whittaker cover gear and gear placement for crack climbing.

Choosing the Right Tool for the Job – Carabiners

The Black Diamond Journal recently posted an excellent article that discusses some of the characteristics of various types of carabiners.  It’s an excellent overview of carabiners in general, but also contains some details of interest to seasoned climbers.  I’ll post an excerpt here- for the rest, check out the original post on Black Diamond’s blog.


QC LAB: Choosing the Right Tool for the Job – Carabiners

By Kolin Powick

With dozens of companies making untold numbers of carabiners these days, it can be a real chore to navigate through countless different models to choose the one that’s right for your type of climbing. Wiregate vs. standard gate.  AutoLock vs. screwgate. Ultralight vs. heavy. What biners should I use on my slimmed-down alpine rack as opposed to my daily sport cragging kit? As with most pieces of climbing gear, there is a certain amount of inherent versatility, but often certain products are better suited, and more often than not designed specifically for certain applications. As with almost anything, it’s always prudent to select the right tool for the job. This month we’ll attempt to distill the basics of carabiner usage to help you figure out what’s the right choice for your type of climbing.

Differences between Industrial and Recreational Carabiners

We’ll start off with a quick word on basic carabiner use because we get this question all the time.

I get lots of random calls from arborists, fire departments, rescue workers, marinas, yachting folks, Jeep guys and warehouse personnel wanting to know if it’s okay to use our carabiners for their particular application. The official answer is always no, not recommended. Just as all of our instructions say, our gear is “For Climbing and Mountaineering Only.” But why?

The simple answer is that we are climbers and mountaineers, we know climbing and mountaineering, and we design, test and certify our gear for climbing and mountaineering. We’re not as intimate with the loads, the uses, misuses and abuses of these other applications.

What many people may not realize is the different ways that recreational gear is designed, tested and rated compared to industrial equipment. Industrial carabiners are usually made of steel, are much heavier, are much stronger, and rated differently than aluminum climbing carabiners.

An industrial carabiner is usually rated to a SWL (safe working load, or safe working limit)- of let’s say 30kN. This means that you can load the carabiner safely to 30kN. And in industrial applications there is almost always some kind of safety factor say of 2 or greater, which means that the carabiner won’t actually break until around 60kN. However, climbing gear is rated to the load at which it will actually break. So a 20kN carabiner actually breaks at that load. There’s a big difference.

Bottom line: Climbing gear shouldn’t be used in industrial applications—it just isn’t designed and rated for those types of loads and situations.


This is only a small excerpt of the complete article- to see the rest, visit Black Diamond’s Journal here.

 

How to Choose a Climbing Rope

The climbing rope is responsible for saving thousands of climbers’ lives every single day. No piece of gear more important than the rope. It’s not only your lifeline, but a link to your partner—and your ticket to a wild, high place. It’s a metaphor for everything that is truly meaningful in this vertical sport. It’s also a pretty cool piece of gear.

 

 

 


Andrew Bisharat is a prominent climbing blogger, publishing at his site Evening Sends.  A few weeks back he published How to Choose a Climbing Rope, which contained a good bit of information for people looking to purchase a rope or simply desiring to know a bit more about them.  The paragraph before the break above is from his article, as is the excerpt below.  To see the rest, visit his blog.


Early climbing ropes (from the 1700s up to the 1930s) appeared around alpine villages like Zermatt, Switzerland, and were made of braided hemp, flax, manila, cotton or horsehair. These early experiments resulted in climbing cords with terrible strength-to-weight ratios, poor durability and low elasticity. They snapped in falls easily, often resulting in tragedy. The mantra of the era, “The leader must not fall,” wasn’t just a catchy phrase.

World War II was a catalyst for innovation in the climbing world, with advances made in carabiners and pitons. However, nothing revolutionized climbing as greatly as the introduction of ropes made of nylon, a material Arnold Wexler of the U.S. Bureau of Standards concluded, in 1945, was superior to all other materials for this application. In 1953, the German rope manufactuer Edelrid introduced the kernmantle rope, an even bigger innovation that resulted in extremely durable ropes that didn’t kink or twist—and best of all, they could handle repeated lead falls. A kernmantle rope has a strong braided-nylon “core” of strands (the kern) that are encased within an abrasion-resistant sheath (the mantle). All modern climbing ropes now use the kernmantle design.

Today, climbing ropes are extremely reliable. “The leader must not fall” has been replaced with “If you don’t fall, you’re not trying hard enough!” There are over 100 different climbing ropes on the market, all of which come in various lengths, diameters, and categories. It’s important to understand how ropes are classified before making a purchase. Here is a basic primer for getting onto the sharp end.

Static vs. Dynamic: This is the most general categorization of ropes, but also the most important to not confuse. Static ropes do not stretch. Dynamic ropes stretch a lot. Static ropes are not for lead climbing! Because static ropes don’t stretch, climbers typically use them for hauling loads on big-walls, or fixing lines on new routes. Static ropes can be used for top-roping, but, again, never for leading. The elastic qualities of a dynamic rope are what make falling on lead safe because, with rope stretch, the forces on the gear, belayer and climber go way down. Dynamic ropes are what you will use 99 percent of the time.


There’s more to this story! Visit Andrew’s blog here to read the rest of this article.

Petzl’s Holiday Safety Notice

You know the nifty little instruction and warning labels that are usually attached to new climbing hardware?  You know, the ones that are usually printed in microtext and folded into a tiny, dense pellet?  The good folks at Petzl have decided that it’s best to ensure the safety of old Saint Nick, and have designed a special version just for his use.  Enjoy- and Happy Holidays from all of us at Nomad Ventures!

(click to enlarge)

How-to Video: Black Diamond ATC-Guide

The Black Diamond ATC-Guide is an excellent device for belaying and rappelling and has features like a high-friction mode that make it a very good choice for users of all ability levels.  However, with a little training the device can be used in “Guide mode” which allows the belayer to belay or lower two seconding climbers simultaneously.  Check the video for details!

10 days only! C.A.M.P. Photon carabiners and quickdraws 25% off

From September 15-25, all C.A.M.P. Photon carabiners and quickdraws are 25% off.  If you need to add to your rack, replace old gear, or just like shiny new hardware, this is an awesome time to do it!

Magnetic Carabiners- how do they work?

Coming July 2012 from Black Diamond– the Magnetron!

I know it sounds like the name of a Transformer, but actually it’s a new type of auto-locking carabiner.  We’ll have to wait a whole year to see them in stores- what are your thoughts?

You can read the entire post about the Magnetron at Black Diamond’s Journal.

Petzl GRIGRI 2 Recall Info

Petzl has recalled all GRIGRI 2’s (D14 2O, D14 2G, D14 2B ) with the first five digits of the serial number  between 10326 and 11136.

Petzl’s website has been down much of the day, so I’ve copied the information here to help get the word out.

Note: in lieu of returning your GriGri 2 to the store, Petzl has requested that all customers contact them directly.

Remainder of post is via Petzl:

Recall for replacement: GRIGRI 2

Concerns all GRIGRI 2’s (D14 2O, D14 2G, D14 2B ) with the first five digits of the serial number  between 10326 and 11136.

 

Background

Petzl has discovered that exertingexcessive force on the fully extended handle of the GRIGRI 2 can cause internal damage, such that the GRIGRI 2 handle may become stuck in the open position.

When the handle is stuck in this position the assisted braking function is disabled. A damaged GRIGRI 2 in this configuration will function similarly to a manual belay device (e.g. tube style device).

When using a damaged GRIGRI 2 with the handle stuck in the position as shown in Figure 1, failure to control the braking side of the rope will increase the risk of an uncontrolled descent. A GRIGRI 2 with a damaged handle must be immediately retired from service.

It is important to note that failure to control the braking side of the rope is a misuse of the GRIGRI 2 under any circumstance (See GRIGRI 2 Technical Notice – pdf file, 2,5Mo).

As of June 20, 2011, seven damaged products have been returned to Petzl through our worldwide distribution network. Petzl has no knowledge of any accidents resulting from a damaged GRIGRI 2 handle.

Petzl Response

Because the safety of our users is our primary concern, as a measure of precaution Petzl has decided to take the following actions:

  • increase the mechanical strength of the handle on all GRIGRI 2’s since serial number 11137.
  • recall all GRIGRI 2’s with the first five digits of the serial number between 10326 and 11136, and replace with a new revised GRIGRI 2.

Petzl will pay for all shipping costs to complete this replacement.

If you have a GRIGRI 2 (D14 2O, D14 2G, D14 2B) with the first five digits of the serial number between 10326 and 11136, stop use immediately and contact Petzl America to initiate an exchange.

Contact Petzl America in one of two ways:
– By phone: 1 (800) 932-2978 (toll free)
– By email: grigri2recall@petzl.com

The previous generation GRIGRI is not concerned by this recall.

“While the potential risk of damaging the GRIGRI 2’s handle is very small, our total commitment to the safety of our users has led us to make this decision. With the summer climbing season just beginning, Petzl understands that this recall comes at an inconvenient time and we are working hard to ensure that everyone receives their replacement GRIGRI 2 as quickly as possible. Everyone at Petzl is committed to resolving this issue. We thank you for your continued support.”

Romain Lécot
Petzl General Director

Contact

Country / Pays Distributor / Distributeur email adress / Adresse email Phone number / Téléphone
ARGENTINA ECRIN SA info@ecrin.com.ar 000541147921935
AUSTRALIA SPELEAN PTY LTD grigri2@petzl.com.au +61 2 9966 9800
AUSTRIA AGENTUR BERGER mberger@petzl.at 0043761660027
BENELUX ALPITEC SNC recall.grigri2@alpitec.be +32 85 31 43 85
BRAZIL SPELAION spelaionbrasil@gmail.com 0055 19 34340535
BULGARIA PIK 3000 LTD office@pik3000.com +359 (2) 8432 943
CHILE OUT CHILE S.A rafael@outchile.com 00562 8955094
CHINA BEIJING SNOWBIRD OUTDOOR liuli@snowbird.com.cn 00861080118873
CZECH REPUBLIC VERTICAL SPORT vertical@vertical.cz 00420 483 711 456
DENMARK SCANLICO DENMARK A/S info@scanlico.dk 004538716959
ECUADOR ANGEL ROBERTO GUTIERREZ asistenciatecnica@petzl.com.ec 005922237601
FINLAND VANDERNET vandernet@vandernet.com 00358207418330
FRANCE PETZL rappel.grigri2@petzl.fr 0811 46 10 50
GERMANY C & M KRAH GmbH recall.grigri2@krah.com 0049 8008888104
GREECE DIMKA LTD odi@resoul.gr 0030 22950 231110
HONG KONG MOUNTAIN SERVICES INT LTD info@mshk.com.hk 0085225418876
HUNGARY GRANIT DESIGN KFT info@granit.co.hu 0036 99 523 294
INDIA ALLIED SAFETY EQUIPMENTS info@alliedpetzl.com +91-22-28454274 / 75
IRAN KOOH VEISI TRADING CO. info@koohveisi.com 009821 7533 173
ISRAEL LAPIDOT OUTDOOR EQUIP LTD info@lapidot.co.il 0097289797040
ITALIA DINAMICHE VERTICALI grigri2@petzl.it 0039 0112732500
JAPAN ALTERIA CO., LTD grigri2@alteria.co.jp 0081429691717
KORE, REPUBLIC OF ANNAPURNA CORPORATION annapurna@unitel.co.kr 0082220828450
MEXICO ALTA VERTICAL sa de cv contacto@altavertical.com 00 52 5555621602
NEW ZEALAND SPELEAN (NZ) LTD grigri2@petzl.co.nz +64 3 434 9535
NORWAY VARRI AS post@varri.no 0047 2271 9200
PERU MON VERTICAL SAC info@mv.pe 0051 957 771 979
POLOGNE PHU AMC sp.j. info@amc.krakow.pl 0048 12 656 70 88
PORTUGAL SUBMATE LDA recall.petzl@submate.pt +351 218 471 269
ROMANIA GD ESCAPADE SRL himalaya@rdslink.ro 0040213144071
RUSSIE ALPINE TRADE info@alpine-trade.ru 007 495 225 73 43
SINGAPORE ALLSPORTS EQUIPMENT sales@allsports.com.sg 006563377728
SLOVENIE TREKING SPORT D.O.O trek@siol.net 00386 12 562 501
SOUTH AFRICA EIGER EQUIPMENT LTD john@eigerequipment.co.za 002721 555 0363
SPAIN VERTICAL SPORTS, SL grigri@vertical.es 0034 933 091 091
SWEDEN C2 VERTICAL SAFETY AB info@c2safety.com 0046 18 677990
SWITZERLAND ALTIMUM SA info@petzl.ch 0041 21 947 46 66
TAIWAN REP CHINA FUTAI COMPANY LTD tfgod@tfg.com.tw 00886227967373
THAILAND ROCKCAMP INTERNAT. CO LTD rockcamp@thaiclimbing.com 006624346100
TURKEY TOROS TURIZM HIZMETLERI info@toroskamp.com 00902164122127
UKRAINE VYSOTA info@vysota.com.ua 0038 044 417 33 86
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES TRAKS james@traks-me.com 0097150 550 3430
UNITED KINGDOM LYON EQUIPMENT LIMITED grigri2@lyon.co.uk 0044 15 396 25 493
UNITED STATES PETZL AMERICA info@petzl.com (801) 926-1500
URUGUAY VERANEX info@veranex.com 0054 11 47921935
VENEZUELA UAIKINIMA 5X C.A info@petzl.com.ve 0058 212 762 3923
OTHER COUNTRIES : please use the contact form

FAQ

  • How do you tell the difference between a GRIGRI  and a GRIGRI 2?
    The GRIGRI² has been available on the market since January 2011.
    If you purchased your device before 1st January 2011, then it isn’t a GRIGRI² and so is not affected by this recall for exchange.
    If you purchased your device after the 1st of January 2011, then compare it with the images published in our announcements for this recall for exchange.
  • How can I tell if a GRIGRI 2 is included in this recall for exchange?
    GRIGRI²s with serial numbers from 10326 to 11136 are included in this exchange.
  • Where do you find the serial number of the GRIGRI 2?
    The serial number is laser engraved on the body of the product underneath and protected by the folded handle.
  • What should I do with my GRIGRI 2 when it is included in the recall for exchange?
    Contact your national distributor by email, providing your postal address in order to begin the exchange process.
  • Apart from the serial number, how can I tell the difference between a GRIGRI 2 with a reinforced handle and a GRIGRI 2 concerned by the recall for exchange?
    A GRIGRI² with a reinforced handle is only recognisable by a serial number after 11136.
  • How do I know whether a new GRIGRI 2 for sale in a shop has the reinforced handle?
    The first five numbers of the serial number are after 11136.
    To help our retailers in replacing their stocks, we have temporarily added a green sticker to the product.
  • How long will the exchange take?
    Petzl and our distribution network have everything in place to facilitate the exchange within 2 working days, excluding transport.
  • Will I receive the same colour GRIGRI 2 ?
    Yes
  • Can I change the colour?
    No
  • Can I replace my GRIGRI 2 with a GRIGRI?
    No
  • Where is the GRIGRI 2 manufactured?
    In France, in Petzl’s production unit in Crolles (Isère region).
  • Where have these GRIGRI 2 been sold?
    Throughout our global distribution network.
  • What is the guarantee of a Petzl product?
    A Petzl product is covered by a 3-year guarantee against all material or manufacturing defect. Exclusions: normal wear and tear, oxidation, modifications or alterations, incorrect storage, poor maintenance, negligence, uses for which this product is not designed.
  • What is the lifetime of a Petzl product?
    Lifetime / When to retire your equipment for Petzl’s plastic and textile products, the maximum lifetime is 10 years from the date of manufacture. It is indefinite for metallic products.– ATTENTION: an exceptional event can lead you to retire a product after only one use, depending on the type and intensity of usage and the environment of usage (harsh environments, marine environment, sharp edges, extreme temperatures, chemical products, etc.).
    – A product must be retired when:
    It is over 10 years old and made of plastic or textiles.
    It has been subjected to a major fall (or load).
    It fails to pass inspection. You have any doubt as to its reliability.
    You do not know its full usage history.
    When it becomes obsolete due to changes in legislation, standards, technique
    or incompatibility with other equipment, etc.
    Destroy retired equipment to prevent further use.

The Making of a Carabiner

Check out this video that Black Diamond recently posted that shows how they make the GridLock belay carabiner that is new for 2011.

Manufacturing the Black Diamond GridLock belay carabiner from Black Diamond Equipment on Vimeo.